Journal cover Journal topic
Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.470 IF 3.470
  • IF 5-year value: 4.009 IF 5-year
    4.009
  • CiteScore value: 3.45 CiteScore
    3.45
  • SNIP value: 1.166 SNIP 1.166
  • IPP value: 3.28 IPP 3.28
  • SJR value: 1.929 SJR 1.929
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 64 Scimago H
    index 64
  • h5-index value: 43 h5-index 43
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2020-51
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2020-51
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 18 May 2020

Submitted as: research article | 18 May 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal CP.

Life and death in the Chicxulub impact crater: A record of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

Vann Smith1,2, Sophie Warny1,2, Kliti Grice3, Bettina Schaefer3, Michael T. Whalen4, Johan Vellekoop5,6, Elise Chenot7, Sean P. S. Gulick8,9, Ignacio Arenillas10, Jose A. Arz10, Thorsten Bauersachs11, Timothy Bralower12, François Demory13, Jerôme Gattacceca13, Heather Jones12, Johanna Lofi14, Christopher M. Lowery8, Joanna Morgan15, Noelia B. Nuñez Otaño16, Jennifer M. K. O'Keefe17, Katherine O'Malley4, Francisco J. Rodríguez-Tovar18, Lorenz Schwark3,11, and the Expedition 364 Scientists Vann Smith et al.
  • 1Department of Geology and Geophysics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
  • 2Museum of Natural Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
  • 3Western Australian Organic and Isotope Geochemistry Centre, The Institute for Geoscience Research, School of Earth andPlanetary Science, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6102, Australia
  • 4Department of Geosciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
  • 5Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Division of Geology, KU Leuven, 3001 Heverlee, Belgium
  • 6Analytical, Environmental and Geo-Chemistry (AMGC), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels, Belgium
  • 7GeoRessources, Université de Lorraine, CNRS, 54500 Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, France
  • 8Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin, TX 78712, USA
  • 9Institute for Geophysics, Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin, TX 78712, USA
  • 10Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra e Instituto Universitario de Investigación de Ciencias Ambientales de Aragón,Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain
  • 11Department of Organic Geochemistry, Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, 24118, Germany
  • 12Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16801, USA
  • 13CNRS, Aix-Marseille Univ, IRD, Coll France, INRAE, CEREGE, Aix-en-Provence, France
  • 14Géosciences Montpellier, lUniversité Montpellier, CNRS, Montpellier, France
  • 15Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ, UK
  • 16Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología (FCyT), Universidad Autónoma de Entre Ríos, CONICET, Laboratorio de Geología delNeógeno-Cuaternario, Diamante, Entre Ríos, Argentina
  • 17Department of Physics, Earth Science, and Space Systems Engineering, Morehead State University, Morehead, KY, USA
  • 18Departamento de Estratigrafía y Paleontología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, 18002 Granada, Spain
  • A full list of authors and their affiliations appears at the end of the paper.

Abstract. Thermal stress on the biosphere during the extreme warmth of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) was most severe at low latitudes, with sea surface temperatures at some localities exceeding the 35 °C at which marine organisms experience heat stress. Relatively few equivalent terrestrial sections have been identified, and the response of land plants to this extreme heat is still poorly understood. Here, we present a new PETM record from the peak ring of the Chicxulub impact crater that has been identified based on nannofossil biostratigraphy, an acme of the dinoflagellate genus Apectodinium, and a negative carbon isotope excursion. Geochemical and microfossil proxies show that the PETM is marked by elevated TEX86H-based sea surface temperatures (SSTs) averaging ~37.8 °C, an increase in terrestrial input, surface productivity, salinity stratification, and bottom water anoxia, with biomarkers for green and purple sulfur bacteria indicative of photic zone euxinia in the early part of the event. Pollen and plants spores in this core provide the first PETM floral assemblage described from México, Central America, and the northern Caribbean. The source area was a diverse coastal shrubby tropical forest, with a remarkably high abundance of fungal spores indicating humid conditions. Thus, while seafloor anoxia devastated the benthic marine biota, and dinoflagellate assemblages were heat-stressed, the terrestrial plant ecosystem thrived.

Vann Smith et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 13 Jul 2020)
Status: open (until 13 Jul 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Vann Smith et al.

Vann Smith et al.

Metrics will be available soon.
Latest update: 02 Jun 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
A rare tropical record of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, a potential analog for future global warming, has been identified from post-impact strata in the Chicxulub crater. Multiproxy analysis has yielded evidence for increased humidity, increased pollen and fungi input, salinity stratification, bottom water anoxia, and sea surface temperatures up to 38 °C. Pollen and plant spore assemblages indicate a nearby diverse coastal shrubby tropical forest resilient to hyperthermal conditions.
A rare tropical record of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, a potential analog for future...
Citation