Journal cover Journal topic
Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.470 IF 3.470
  • IF 5-year value: 4.009 IF 5-year
    4.009
  • CiteScore value: 3.45 CiteScore
    3.45
  • SNIP value: 1.166 SNIP 1.166
  • IPP value: 3.28 IPP 3.28
  • SJR value: 1.929 SJR 1.929
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 64 Scimago H
    index 64
  • h5-index value: 43 h5-index 43
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2019-116
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2019-116
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: review article 24 Sep 2019

Submitted as: review article | 24 Sep 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Climate of the Past (CP).

A survey of the impacts of summer droughts in England, 1200–1700

Kathleen Pribyl1,2 Kathleen Pribyl
  • 1Climatic Research Unit, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, UK
  • 2Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Switzerland

Abstract. Droughts pose a climatic hazard that can have a profound impacts on past societies. Using documentary sources, this paper studies the occurrence and impacts of spring-summer droughts in pre-industrial England from 1200 to 1700. The types of records, source availability and changes in record keeping over time are described, and an overview of droughts in those 500 years is provided. The focus lies on a structural survey over the drought impacts most relevant to human livelihood. This includes the agricultural and pastoral sectors of agrarian production, health, the fire risk to settlements and the drop in water levels or dwindling of water supplies. Whereas due the specific characteristics of wheat cultivation in medieval and early modern England, the grain production was comparatively resilient to drought, livestock farming was under threat when rainfall fell noticeably below average. The most important problem in warm and dry summers, however, was the risk to health. Partly steeply raised mortality levels were associated with these conditions during the study period, because malaria, gastrointestinal disease and plague showed an affinity to heat and drought. Adaptation strategies to reduce the stress posed by summer droughts are included in the study.

Kathleen Pribyl
Interactive discussion
Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Login for Authors/Editors] [Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Kathleen Pribyl
Viewed  
Total article views: 499 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
406 86 7 499 14 2 3
  • HTML: 406
  • PDF: 86
  • XML: 7
  • Total: 499
  • Supplement: 14
  • BibTeX: 2
  • EndNote: 3
Views and downloads (calculated since 24 Sep 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 24 Sep 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 390 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 389 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 12 Dec 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Droughts pose a climatic hazard that can have a profound impacts on past societies. Using documentary sources, this paper studies the occurrence and impacts of spring-summer droughts in pre-industrial England from 1200 to 1700. The impacts most relevant to human livelihood, including the agricultural and pastoral sectors of agrarian production, and public health, are evaluated.
Droughts pose a climatic hazard that can have a profound impacts on past societies. Using...
Citation