Journal cover Journal topic
Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.174 IF 3.174
  • IF 5-year value: 3.841 IF 5-year 3.841
  • CiteScore value: 3.48 CiteScore 3.48
  • SNIP value: 1.078 SNIP 1.078
  • SJR value: 1.981 SJR 1.981
  • IPP value: 3.38 IPP 3.38
  • h5-index value: 42 h5-index 42
  • Scimago H index value: 58 Scimago H index 58
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2018-99
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2018-99
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 12 Oct 2018

Research article | 12 Oct 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Climate of the Past (CP).

The 4.2 cal ka BP Event in Northeastern China: A Geospatial Perspective

Louis A. Scuderi1, Xiaoping Yang2, Samantha E. Ascoli1, and Hongwei Li2 Louis A. Scuderi et al.
  • 1Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA
  • 2School of Earth Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, P. R. China

Abstract. The Hunshandake Sandy Lands of northeastern China, currently a semi-arid lightly-vegetated region, were characterized by perennial lakes and forest stands in the early and middle Holocene. Well-developed dark grassland-type paleosols (mollisols) at the southern edge of the Hunshandake, OSL-dated to between 6.93±0.61 and 4.27±0.38calkaBP along with lacustrine sands in higher elevations that date to between 5.7±0.3 and 5.2±0.2calka BP, and thick gray lacustrine sediments suggest a wetter climate. Between 4.2 and 3.8calkaBP the region experienced extreme drying that was exacerbated by headwater cutting of the overflow drainage that depleted the groundwater table through sapping. The region supported a robust population, the Hongshan Culture. The region depopulated post-4.2calkaBP and its people migrated out of the region, likely to the Yellow River Valley where they introduced their characteristic cultural elements to early Chinese civilization. Evidence for extreme and sudden environmental change in northeastern China, at and following the 4.2calkaBP event and like that we document in the Hunshandake, is widespread. However, no comprehensive overview exists. Here we discuss the relevant events in northeastern China and capture them in a spatially explicit Geographic Information Systems database that can be used to analyze the timing and spatial pattern of climate associated with the 4.2calkaBP event. This approach could serve as a prototype for a Global 4.2calkaBP event database.

Louis A. Scuderi et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 07 Dec 2018)
Status: open (until 07 Dec 2018)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Louis A. Scuderi et al.
Louis A. Scuderi et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 400 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
333 58 9 400 2 6
  • HTML: 333
  • PDF: 58
  • XML: 9
  • Total: 400
  • BibTeX: 2
  • EndNote: 6
Views and downloads (calculated since 12 Oct 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 12 Oct 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 400 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 399 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 16 Nov 2018
Publications Copernicus
Special issue
Download
Short summary
Lack of integration of data into a scientifically credible, globally assembled, information platform with consistent terminology and definitions hinders understanding of the 4.2 ka event. Using such an information platform we show the presence of a strong and coherent signal for the 4.2 ka event in northeastern China. Our prototype database approach, guided by sematic analysis and georeferencing, can serve as a guide to the assembly of a larger scale global 4.2 ka database.
Lack of integration of data into a scientifically credible, globally assembled, information...
Citation
Share