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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2018-162
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2018-162
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 16 Jan 2019

Research article | 16 Jan 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Climate of the Past (CP).

Is there evidence for a 4.2 ka BP event in the northern North Atlantic region?

Raymond Bradley1 and Jostein Bakke2 Raymond Bradley and Jostein Bakke
  • 1Department of Geosciences/Climate System Research Center, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA
  • 2Department of Earth Science/Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, University of Bergen, Norway

Abstract. We review paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic records from the northern North Atlantic to assess the nature of climatic conditions at 4.2 ka BP, which has been identified as a time of exceptional climatic anomalies in many parts of the world. The northern North Atlantic region experienced relatively warm conditions in the early Holocene (6–8 ka BP) followed by a general decline in temperatures after ~ 5 ka BP, which led to the onset of Neoglaciation. Although a few records do show a distinct anomaly around 4.2 ka BP (associated with a glacial advance), this is not widespread and we interpret it as a local manifestation of the overall climatic deterioration that characterizes the late Holocene.

Raymond Bradley and Jostein Bakke
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Status: open (until 23 Mar 2019)
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Raymond Bradley and Jostein Bakke
Raymond Bradley and Jostein Bakke
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Short summary
We review paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic records from the northern North Atlantic to assess the nature of climatic conditions at 4.2 ka BP. There was a general decline in temperatures after ~5 ka BP, which led to the onset of Neoglaciation. Although a few records do show a distinct anomaly around 4.2 ka BP (associated with a glacial advance), this is not widespread and we interpret it as a local manifestation of the overall climatic deterioration that characterized the late Holocene.
We review paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic records from the northern North Atlantic to assess...
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