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Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2017-160
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 09 Jan 2018

Research article | 09 Jan 2018

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This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Climate of the Past (CP) and is expected to appear here in due course.

Tracing winter temperatures over the last two millennia using a NE Atlantic coastal record

Irina Polovodova Asteman1, Helena L. Filipsson2, and Kjell Nordberg1 Irina Polovodova Asteman et al.
  • 1Department of Marine Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Carl Skottbergsgata 22B, 41319 Gothenburg, Sweden
  • 2Department of Geology, University of Lund, Sölvegatan 12, 22362 Lund, Sweden

Abstract. We present 2500 years of reconstructed winter temperatures by using a fjord sediment archive from the NE Atlantic. The study is based on ca. 8-m long sediment core from Gullmar Fjord (Sweden), dated by 210Pb and AMS 14C and analysed for stable oxygen isotopes (δ18O) measured on shallow infaunal benthic foraminiferal species Cassidulina laevigata. The bottom water temperatures (BWTs), calculated by using a palaeotemperature equation of McCorkle et al. (1997), range between 2.7–7.8°C and are within the annual temperature variability, instrumentally recorded in the deep fjord basin since the 1890s. The record demonstrates a warming during the Roman Warm Period (~350BCE–450CE), variable bottom water temperatures during the Dark Ages (~450–850CE), positive bottom water temperature anomalies during the Viking Age/Medieval Climate Anomaly (~850–1350CE) and a long-term cooling with distinct multidecadal variability during the Little Ice Age (~1350–1850CE). The fjord BWT record also picks up the contemporary warming of the 20th century, which does not stand out in the 2500-year perspective and is of the same magnitude as the Roman Warm Period and the Medieval Climate Anomaly.

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Irina Polovodova Asteman et al.
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Irina Polovodova Asteman et al.
Irina Polovodova Asteman et al.
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We present 2500 yrs of winter temperatures, using a sediment core from Gullmar Fjord, analysed for oxygen isotopes in microfossils to reconstruct historical temperatures. They range between the annual temperature variability, recorded since the 1890s. Results demonstrate the warm Roman and Medieval periods, the cold Little Ice Age, as well as the warming of the 20th century, which does not stand out in the 2500-year perspective. It is of the same magnitude as the Roman and Medieval warm periods.
We present 2500 yrs of winter temperatures, using a sediment core from Gullmar Fjord, analysed...
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