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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/cpd-11-4895-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/cpd-11-4895-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 20 Oct 2015

Research article | 20 Oct 2015

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Climate of the Past (CP). The revised manuscript was not accepted.

An astronomical correspondence to the 1470 year cycle of abrupt climate change

A. M. Kelsey1, F. W. Menk2, and P. T. Moss1 A. M. Kelsey et al.
  • 1School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, 4072, Australia
  • 2Centre for Space Physics, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, 2308, Australia

Abstract. The existence of a ~ 1470 year cycle of abrupt climate change is well-established, manifesting in Bond ice-rafting debris (IRD) events, Dansgaard–Oeschger atmospheric temperature cycle, and cyclical climatic conditions precursory to increased El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability and intensity. This cycle is central to questions on Holocene climate stability and hence anthropogenic impacts on climate (deMenocal et al., 2000). To date no causal mechanism has been identified, although solar forcing has been previously suggested. Here we show that interacting combination of astronomical variables related to Earth's orbit may be causally related to this cycle and several associated key isotopic spectral signals. The ~ 1470 year climate cycle may thus be regarded as a high frequency extension of the Milankovitch precessional cycle, incorporating orbital, solar and lunar forcing through interaction with the tropical and anomalistic years and Earth's rotation.

A. M. Kelsey et al.
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A. M. Kelsey et al.
A. M. Kelsey et al.
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Short summary
Sun-Moon-Earth interaction emulates the 1470-year climate change cycle. The sunspot cycle and gravitational impact of the Sun and Moon on Earth’s spinning axis appear to play important roles in this cycle, affecting the orientation and proximity of climatically sensitive geographic regions capable of responding to astronomical forcing. Astronomical data suggest nutation affects incoming solar insolation patterns as solar and lunar declination wobbles match spectral frequencies in isotopic data.
Sun-Moon-Earth interaction emulates the 1470-year climate change cycle. The sunspot cycle and...
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